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Important information: The value of investments can go down as well as up so you may get back less than you invest. Investors should note that the views expressed may no longer be current and may have already been acted upon. This is a third-party news feed and may not reflect Fidelity’s views.

Tuesday newspaper round-up: Nuclear reactors, ITV, Metro Bank

(Sharecast News) - MPs have warned that a planned fleet of small nuclear reactors are unlikely to contribute to hitting a key target in decarbonising Britain's electricity generation, as the government opened talks to buy a site in Wales for a new power station. The Environmental Audit Committee (EAC) said that ministers' approach to developing factory-built nuclear power plants "lacks clarity" and their role in hitting a goal of moving the grid to clean energy by 2035 was unclear. - Guardian

The former Post Office boss Paula Vennells gave Fujitsu a bonus contract in 2013 to take over an archive of branch data, despite warnings such a move would destroy evidence that might clear operators, whistleblowers have said. Transaction information was "replatformed" on cost grounds from a "gold standard" external storage system known as Centera to one owned by the Japanese software company running the Post Office's Horizon IT network. - Guardian

A Mayfair fund has taken a £120m stake in ITV as the broadcaster grapples with a deep advertising downturn and slump in its market value. Silchester International Investors has become one of ITV's largest shareholders after snapping up a 5pc stake in the business. The media-shy fund, which has also built a £500m stake in advertising giant WPP, states that its investment philosophy is to identify fairly valued businesses "capable of increasing earnings, assets and dividends by their own efforts". - Telegraph

A crisis that almost brought down Metro Bank in the autumn has derailed its plan to open branches and create jobs in the north of England in return for a £70 million grant. Metro had pledged to take on 300 staff to serve 15 new high street sites by the end of next year as part of commitments made to secure money from a £775 million pot. The funding was meant to increase competition and services in business banking. - The Times

Staff at RSM and Quantuma are alleged to have wrongfully received tip-offs about potential work from government insolvency staff in a scandal that is being examined by regulators and that has led to the dismissals of least four people. Employees of the accountancy and restructuring firms allegedly received "case data" from staff at the Official Receiver, part of the government's Insolvency Service. - The Times

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Sunday newspaper round-up: Middle East, Aston Martin, Defence
(Sharecast News) - Britons must accept that their country was now involved in the Middle East conflict, Tobias Ellwood said. The former defence minister warned that "nobody was in full control" of the growing conflict as more and more countries were sucked in. Ellwood also said that Tehran's strike had taken the conflict into a "new dangerous territory". - Sunday Telegraph
Friday newspaper round-up: Everton, AstraZeneca, Amazon
(Sharecast News) - Everton has paid about £30m in interest charges to an opaque lender associated with a tax exile, corporate records suggest. The charges appear to have reached about £438,000 a week, according to the troubled Premier League club's most recent set of accounts, a figure more than three times the reported wages of the Everton and England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford. - Guardian
Thursday newspaper round-up: Border controls, McKinsey, KPMG
(Sharecast News) - New post-Brexit UK border controls coming into force later this month will cost British businesses £2bn and fuel higher inflation, according to a report warning that UK-EU trade will be damaged as a result. With less than a month before the introduction of new checks on animal and plant products from 30 April, the insurer Allianz Trade said the controls agreed under Boris Johnson's Brexit deal could add 10% to import costs over the first year. - Guardian
Wednesday newspaper round-up: Shoplifting, EnQuest, Klarna
(Sharecast News) - The government is investing more than £55m in expanding facial recognition systems - including vans that will scan crowded high streets - as part of a renewed crackdown on shoplifting. The scheme was announced alongside plans for tougher punishments for serial or abusive shoplifters in England and Wales, including being forced to wear a tag to ensure they do not revisit the scene of their crime, under a new standalone criminal offence of assaulting a retail worker. - Guardian

Important information: This information is not a personal recommendation for any particular investment. If you are unsure about the suitability of an investment you should speak to one of Fidelity’s advisers or an authorised financial adviser of your choice. When you are thinking about investing in shares, it’s generally a good idea to consider holding them alongside other investments in a diversified portfolio of assets. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future returns.

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