Skip Header
Important information: The value of investments can go down as well as up so you may get back less than you invest. Investors should note that the views expressed may no longer be current and may have already been acted upon. This is a third-party news feed and may not reflect Fidelity’s views.

Tuesday newspaper round-up: Customer service complaints, floating windfarms, Halifax

(Sharecast News) - Customer service complaints have hit their highest level on record and are costing British businesses more than £9bn a month in lost staff time, research has found. As firms struggle to cope with global supply issues and a staffing crisis, the Institute of Customer Service found more consumers were experiencing service issues than at any point since its customer satisfaction index began in 2008. - Guardian

Floating windfarms could be built off the coasts of Cornwall and Pembrokeshire after the Queen's property manager identified a clutch of sites in the Celtic Sea that could host them. The crown estate, which generates money for the Treasury and the royal family, has published five "areas of search" that will be narrowed into development plots to host wind power generation. - Guardian

Boris Johnson must give approval for a pioneering Rolls-Royce mini nuclear reactor project in the next six months or risk delaying a project vital to his green energy revolution, the company has warned. Rolls will be unable to meet a target of deploying its first reactor by 2029 unless ministers place an order before the end of the year according to Tom Samson, the project's chief executive. The company's small modular reactors (SMRs) are expected to play a key part in the Prime Minister's plans for an energy revolution. - Telegraph

A furore about the use of pronouns on staff badges at Halifax has failed to result in a customer exodus, The Times has learnt. Halifax became embroiled in a row last week after it said on social media that customers who disagreed with its policy of allowing employees to display their chosen pronouns were free to close their accounts. - The Times

More than one in three UK company directors disqualified over a two-month period had abused the government's coronavirus loan or job support schemes, according to an analysis of official data. The Insolvency Service banned 37 directors in April and May for fraudulent claims. The disqualifications represented almost 35 per cent of the directors struck off and compares with 140 directors who were banned for abuse of Covid schemes in the year to the end of March: 17 per cent of the total. - The Times

Share this article

Related Sharecast Articles

Monday newspaper round-up: Renewable energy, BlackRock, Frasers Group
(Sharecast News) - A development company that sells off land no longer needed by Thames Water has paid out a £14m dividend despite warnings that it could become engulfed by the water group's financial woes. Accounts filed at Companies House show Kennet Properties paid out a £14.5m dividend in the year to 31 March 2023 despite the difficulties faced by the wider group, which is facing going into administration. - Guardian
Sunday share tips: Mitie, Costain
(Sharecast News) - The Financial Mail on Sunday's Midas column tipped shares of Mitie to its readers, highlighting it shift from facilities management to facilities transformation.
Sunday newspaper round-up: IDS, Ocado, Foxtons
(Sharecast News) - Asset manager Redwheel told regulators they should reduce the UK postal service's legal obligations. The move followed a failed buyout attempt by Daniel Kretinsky for International Distributions Services, its parent company. The billionaire investor was said to be evaluating a possible improved bid. The company meanwhile has petitioned Ofcom to let it cut the number of days per week during which it must deliver second-class mail from six to two or three. That would save the company £300m and see it shrink its workforce by 1,000. According to Redwheel, as first reported by the Sunday Times, the enforced costs of its legal obligations left the company "vulnerable to corporate predators". - Guardian
Friday newspaper round-up: Thames Water, Netflix, consumer confidence
(Sharecast News) - "Misleading" and "inconsistent" labels make it hard for shoppers to know where their food comes from, the consumer champion Which? has said, as it found supermarket chains were selling products with "meaningless" statements on their packaging. Retailers must supply the "country of origin" for specific foods including fresh fruit and vegetables, unprocessed meats, fish, wine and olive oil but the rules do not generally apply to processed meat or frozen or processed fruit and vegetables. - Guardian

Important information: This information is not a personal recommendation for any particular investment. If you are unsure about the suitability of an investment you should speak to one of Fidelity’s advisers or an authorised financial adviser of your choice. When you are thinking about investing in shares, it’s generally a good idea to consider holding them alongside other investments in a diversified portfolio of assets. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future returns.

Award-winning online share dealing

Search, compare and select from thousands of shares.

Expert insights into investing your money

Our team of experts explore the world of share dealing.