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Important information: The value of investments can go down as well as up so you may get back less than you invest. Investors should note that the views expressed may no longer be current and may have already been acted upon. This is a third-party news feed and may not reflect Fidelity’s views.

Thursday newspaper round-up: Telecoms bills, Dyson, Ocado, Elon Musk

(Sharecast News) - Almost 6 million UK households are struggling to pay their mobile, landline and broadband bills, with the cost of living squeeze forcing many to cut back on essentials such as food and clothes, cancel or change a service, or miss payments to stay connected. A report from the consumer group Which? estimates that 5.7 million households have experienced at least one "affordability issue" in April, as cash-strapped homes struggle to cope with soaring bills and other costs. - Guardian The technology company Dyson has been fined more than £1m after one of its employees was injured when a giant milling machine fell on top of him. Dyson was ordered to pay £1.2m at Swindon magistrates court for failing to properly train its staff in handling the kit. The firm pleaded guilty to breaching health and safety laws. - Guardian

A senior City lawyer who told a client to "burn" chat logs to prevent evidence reaching Ocado could face prison for contempt of court. Raymond McKeeve, a former partner at Jones Day, was found by a High Court judge to have intentionally destroyed documents to stop data being searched at a company created by Jonathan Faiman, Ocado's co-founder. A search order had been issued after Ocado accused Mr Faiman's company of stealing corporate intelligence. - Telegraph

The Serious Fraud Office has convicted a fraudster of encouraging thousands of people to invest in properties in the Caribbean that were never built. David Ames has been found guilty on two counts of fraud by abuse of position for his role in the seven-year scheme as head of Harlequin Group. Mr Ames convinced 8,000 investors to pay a 30pc deposit on an unbuilt villa or hotel room and took half of the money as fees for the company and salesmen. - Telegraph

Elon Musk is seeking details from Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan Chase about how the two banks advised Twitter when the Tesla boss was pursuing his $44 billion takeover of the social media company. Twitter is attempting to force Musk to complete the buyout, which the billionaire said in July he was backing out of over claims that the business had breached the terms of an agreement. - The Times

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(Sharecast News) - Everton has paid about £30m in interest charges to an opaque lender associated with a tax exile, corporate records suggest. The charges appear to have reached about £438,000 a week, according to the troubled Premier League club's most recent set of accounts, a figure more than three times the reported wages of the Everton and England goalkeeper Jordan Pickford. - Guardian
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(Sharecast News) - New post-Brexit UK border controls coming into force later this month will cost British businesses £2bn and fuel higher inflation, according to a report warning that UK-EU trade will be damaged as a result. With less than a month before the introduction of new checks on animal and plant products from 30 April, the insurer Allianz Trade said the controls agreed under Boris Johnson's Brexit deal could add 10% to import costs over the first year. - Guardian

Important information: This information is not a personal recommendation for any particular investment. If you are unsure about the suitability of an investment you should speak to one of Fidelity’s advisers or an authorised financial adviser of your choice. When you are thinking about investing in shares, it’s generally a good idea to consider holding them alongside other investments in a diversified portfolio of assets. Past performance is not a reliable indicator of future returns.

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