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No time to invest? Here’s a woman who can do it for you

Emma-Lou Montgomery, Fidelity Personal Investing, 1 August 2019

It’s a familiar story. You’ve got a million and one things to do. Your boss has given you another impossible deadline, the kids need dropping off at opposite ends of town, your other half’s out of town, your dog needs a haircut (in fact you need a haircut, but that will have to wait), the boiler service is at midday, your mother-in-law’s popping round at 6pm and somehow in between all that you’ve got to collect the dry cleaning, do the weekly shop and make dinner before the hungry hoards arrive, complaining of how tired and exhausted they are after their long days.

But this isn’t just your day today. This is every day. So when you see an advert reminding you to open an ISA or a friend tells you they’ve checked their pension and it’s up 20% you can be excused for giving a wry smile and thinking: “Sure, I’ll put that on my ‘to do’ list too…along with the other 500 other things I’ll never get around to doing”.

If that all sounds familiar, you’re not alone. When we surveyed 1,000 women about their financial habits for Fidelity’s Financial Power of Women report we found that lack of time is something that so many women give as a reason why they don’t invest or aren’t saving enough. 

We’re so often told “you can’t have it all”. And “something’s got to give”. Unfortunately for too many women, it’s our financial futures that suffer as we put off what we should do today to one side while we struggle to keep up with the day-to-day.

For busy women, in particular, juggling a career and a household plus a family too can mean that our financial wellbeing is little more than a passing thought, which also goes some way to explaining why our report showed that more than half (52%) of us who hold a pension have no idea where it’s invested and close to a third (37%) of us don’t know how much our pensions are worth. 

But help is at hand. If you haven’t got the time to invest, then you need to put your financial future into the hands of a professional fund manager. It’s their job to make all the decisions you would if you had the time, and can keep your financial security on track - while you look after everything else.

Ayesha Akbar is one such manager, who runs the Fidelity Select 50 Balanced Fund.

Her job is to pick funds to build a fund of funds that aims to generate growth and income over the longer-term, from the Select 50, which is a list that our experts view as the best of the best.

Ayesha’s job is to follow Brexit, the US/China trade war, escalating tension in the Middle East, you name it, and position the fund so that it grows, no matter what happens.

The fund also provides instant access to a global range of assets, from equities to bonds, as well as alternative assets like gold and other commodities.

The Fidelity Select 50 Balanced Fund works within fixed limits, which allow her to invest between 30% and 70% of the fund in equities, 20-60% in debt such as bonds, and a maximum of 20% in cash - perhaps while she waits for the right opportunity.

Ayesha can also invest across countries and has a host of funds managed by various fund managers to choose from.

I spoke to Ayesha recently and asked her how she runs the fund, how she’s currently positioning the portfolio and what events she will be keeping an eye on in the coming months.

 

Find out more on the Fidelity Select 50 Balanced Fund

 

Important information The value of investments and the income from them can go down as well as up so you may get back less than you invest. Investors should note that the views expressed may no longer be current and may have already been acted upon. Overseas investments will be affected by movements in currency exchange rates. Select 50 is not a personal recommendation to buy or sell a fund. There is a risk that the issuers of bonds may not be able to repay the money they have borrowed or make interest payments. When interest rates rise, bonds may fall in value. Rising interest rates may cause the value of your investment to fall. This information is not a personal recommendation for any particular investment. If you are unsure about the suitability of an investment you should speak to an authorised financial adviser.

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