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Invest in your ISA to get your happy ever after - whatever you wish for

Emma-Lou Montgomery

Emma-Lou Montgomery - Fidelity Personal Investing

Important information: The value of investments, and the income from them, can go down as well as up, so you may get back less than you invest.

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Whether you’re an old romantic and a sucker for hearts and flowers or you think Valentine’s Day is just another cynical ploy to get us spending, it is at least a timely reminder for us to do one thing - show those closest to us a little love.

And this Valentine’s Day that includes you. We hear all the time about investing in our relationships; putting in some time and effort to make sure they’re ticking along nicely. This year, whether you’re married, co-habiting, loved-up or resolutely single, the time has come to share the love and make sure that you and your finances are ticking along just as nicely.

If you spend some time investing in your personal finances today you could be richly rewarded tomorrow. So whether 2020 is the year you plan to get married, start a family, buy a new home, start a business or take a dream holiday, show your finances some love this Valentine’s Day and you will get your happy ever after - whatever that means to you.

If you’re getting married you’ll probably have already found out that weddings cost. While the adage “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue” is highly romantic and traditional for weddings, no soon-to-be married couple wants the “something borrowed” to be their ‘go to’ as it’s their only option because of their poor financial planning.

Saving for your wedding (even before you’ve got the ring on your finger) can help you get the wedding you want, without having to beg and borrow everything along the way.

If you’re moving in together then the prospect of going halves on the rent and being able to stay in rather than have to go out can certainly take the stress off your finances, but what about when you want to start furnishing your new pad just the way you want to? That new sofa won’t come cheap and if you want to buy your own place one day, you need to start putting something aside as soon as possible.

If you dream of starting your own business, then getting on top of your finances is essential. Not only will you be your own boss, but you also need to boss your finances too. Looking after things like your pension and taking care of the other things an employer may provide, like health and life insurance, will now be all down to you. So making sure you’re financially secure and planning for the future too is key.

With a whole new decade and the whole wide world out there to explore, maybe your thoughts are on travel. If so - and depending on how long you want to travel for and where to - having a nice little nest egg will help you get on your way.

Whatever 2020 has in store for you and whether you’re at the planning stage or this is still just one of your ‘life goals’, it’s never too soon to start saving and investing. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to get your money working hard for you. The one thing you don’t want to do, in this lower-for-longer interest rate environment, is leave it all in cash. Interest rates are woefully low, which is great for borrowers, but bad news for anyone wanting to make their money grow.

The first step is to set up a Stocks and Shares ISA and then use your yearly allowance to build a nice savings pot, where any growth is tax-free, giving you more money to put towards whatever tomorrow brings.

Starting small is key. Setting aside a set amount every month and arranging a standing order, so it is automatically transferred to your ISA, is a simple and hassle-free way to get saving. You can save as little as £50 a month with a Fidelity Stocks and Shares ISA. But obviously the more you can save, the better.

Our ISA also lets you stay in control. You can choose from a huge range of options (including funds from over 100 companies and more than 400 shares) to give you the best chance of finding exactly what you need. Plus, we can help make deciding where to invest easier. Our free online guidance and investment selection tools include four funds chosen by our Investment Director Tom Stevenson, plus our Select 50 list of funds recommended by our experts. Why not use our tools to get some help when choosing your investments?

The beauty of investing in an ISA is that the money is yours to use for whatever you want. So, if Plan A gets superseded by Plan B, that’s OK. If you invest wisely, you’ll soon have the start of a nice little nest egg to put towards whatever comes your way. And what’s not to love about that?

Important information: Tax treatment depends on individual circumstances and all tax rules may change in the future. Please note that this information and our guidance tools are not a personal recommendation in respect of a particular investment. If you need additional help, please speak to an authorised financial adviser. You should regularly reassess the suitability of your investments to ensure they continue to meet your attitude to risk and investment goals. Direct shareholdings should generally form part of a well-diversified portfolio of other investments. Investors should note that the views expressed may no longer be current and may have already been acted upon.

What you could do next

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Start saving in an ISA

Invest in our Stocks and Shares ISA and pay no income or capital gains tax on your returns.

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Get help choosing investments

Whether you need a lot of help or a little we have the right tool to help you find an investment

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Download our ISA guide

Our ISA guide gives you all the facts you need to know before starting to invest in an ISA.

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